Jennifer Gremer
Jennifer R. Gremer
Assistant Professor
jrgremer/at/ucdavis(dot)edu

Gremer CV
Google Scholar

 

 

 


imageElise Elwood
Graduate Student
ecelwood/at/ucdavis(dot)edu

I am a first year PhD student in the Population Biology graduate group studying population and community ecology. I am particularly interested in invasive species,  functional traits, and demographic studies.

 

 

 


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Daniel Winkler
Visiting Graduate Student
winklerde/at/ucdavis(dot)edu
winklerde.com

I am a PhD candidate at the University of California, Irvine and a recent National Park Service Young Leader in Climate Change. I am a plant ecophysiologist interested in invasive species, their evolutionary ecology, and their impacts on native plant communities in “extreme” environments. My field sites include much of the desert southwest, alpine regions of Colorado, the montane forests of Baja California, and the tundra of northern Japan. All of my research focuses on climate change impacts on native systems, with an emphasis on Parks and protected areas. For more information, please check out my website.


11289652_10153286742209534_5274062364737070434_o-1-1Alec Chiono
Research Technician
ajchiono/at/ucdavis(dot)edu

In the Gremer Lab, I manage the day-to-day workings of the lab as well as work on two projects centered around native California plants and their ability to deal with climate change: (1) life history variation in Streptanthus tortuosus, and (2) wildflower communities in California grasslands. My research interests align well with my work here, since I have a great interest in the diversity of native plants and plant communities of California and the impacts climate change will have on them.



img_1588Joaquin Meckler-Pacheco
Undergraduate Research Assistant
jrmecklerpacheco/at/ucdavis(dot)edu

My research interests are primarily revolving around plant ecology, focusing on the varying requirements for germination in Streptanthus tortuosus across the different environments it grows in as well as the fitness of the seeds that do germinate in the differing treatments they undergo. I hope to also look at whether the different treatments that induce germination will have any effect on the phenotypic differences in the mature plants.


img_6105Jivka Grozeva
Undergraduate Research Assistant
jvgrozeva/at/ucdavis(dot)edu

My main research interest focuses on the relationship between plant communities and climate change. I am particularly curious in studying how differing climate patterns can affect the growth and abundance of a plant species. I am also interested in researching the correlation between climate change and how that affects the number of invasive species in an area.